The wonder of wood ducks

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Spring is the starting block for wildlife in the race to find suitable mates and nesting sites. With the increased flurry in wildlife activity, staff at the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois also get an increased flurry of phone calls with questions from the public. One recent call came from a gentleman in disbelief upon seeing ducks perched in his trees. He was utterly transfixed by the phenomenon. The call brought back a flash of memory for me of the first time I saw a wood duck (Aix sponsa) as a child, on my maternal grandfather’s property in northern Illinois. Grandpa “Duck,” as we affectionately called him, was an avid outdoorsman. He spent a few moments that spring day pointing out the distinct, vibrantly hued male and the more muted female near a nest hole in an old maple tree. The pair then took off into the woods to the soundtrack of their high-pitched whistling calls.

Male wood ducks are easily identifiable by their glossy green head, chestnut breast, and other vibrant colors. Stock photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

It may seem an odd sight, but wood ducks such as this female can perch on trees and branches. Photo © Michael Warner.

Unlike most dabbling ducks, wood ducks are perching ducks, equipped with well-developed claws that help them cling to branches and nest in tree cavities anywhere from two to 60 feet high. Most courtship displays happen in fall and by mid-winter these ducks have already paired up. Come spring, the mated couples inspect old woodpecker holes, cavities created by broken branches, and wood duck boxes for a suitable nesting spot. Typically, the male will perch nearby while the female tips her head into each potential home before selecting the best nest.

A female wood duck inspects a nest box while a male perches close by. Photo © Janis Stone.

Wood ducks seem to prefer nest sites adjacent to water. Once she has found the perfect hollow, the female will pluck out down from her breast to create a soft space for each egg she lays, stacking soft feathers and eggs in layers. While females usually lay one egg a day, totaling six to 16, their nests are often filled to the brim with up to 30 eggs due to a unique behavior called compound nestingFemale wood ducks will actually lay eggs in multiple nests nearby. The nest owner will incubate them along with her own brood and raise them as if they were her own.

If from the same nest, wood duck young all hatch within a few hours of each other. They’re born precocial, with fuzzy down and the urge and ability to leave home and find food. Just one day post-hatching is considered a wood duck nestling’s “jump day,” in which the chicks leap with abandon, wings spread, from their towering tree nest holes, landing near their waiting mother up to 50 feet below. While the nestlings may be momentarily stunned, they are rarely injured in this seemingly daredevil move. The female then corrals all her young on the ground and heads off to nearby water and feeding areas. The nestlings never look back.

You can participate in Birdwatching Hotspots programs this spring and summer across Lake County. Photo © Tim Elliott.

The duck-spotting gentleman has called back multiple times to speak to the “duck lady,” each time with more anecdotes and questions about the ducks in his yard and the wood duck box he plans to install. It seems fitting that for a short time this spring I have been known as the “duck lady” around the office. I think my Grandpa “Duck” would be proud.

Birdwatching volunteers train atop the new observation deck at Spring Bluff in Winthrop Harbor. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

You can witness the wonders of wood ducks and all the diverse behaviors of birds at our new Birdwatching Hotspots programs in the Lake County Forest Preserves this spring. Join us at Lake County birding hot spots to look for waterfowl, marsh birds, and other migratory species. Spotting scopes and binoculars will be available. Free. All ages welcome. No registration required.

Time to make a moment

This gallery contains 18 photos.

Post by Brett Peto

Time can never be stopped, sped up, or slowed down. It started long before now and will continue far after. But with photographs, we can pause time, pin it in front of us, and study reality. It’s like kneeling at a riverbank and scooping a handful of water. The current stops in your palm, but just a foot beneath it carries on. Photos take time to make a moment.

With nearly 31,000 acres to explore, many moments are possible in the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois. An eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) landing with one foot, wings at sharp angles. A cluster of milkweed seeds hanging on to their pod by threads of floss. Sunflowers and sunbeams, two shades of honey mixing in the air. I’ve collected these special moments and more in a gallery below.

All photos featured were taken by the truly skillful photographers in our group Flickr pool. Each of these images, these presses of the pause button and scoops out of the river, were captured in 2018. Our sincere thanks go to every photographer who shares their time and talent documenting the flora, fauna, and natural areas of Lake County.

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Happy birthday to our hawk

Post by Jen Berlinghof

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a landmark law that protects bird species worldwide. To honor and celebrate this milestone, organizations and citizens have teamed up to designate 2018 the “Year of the Bird.” We at the Lake County Forest Preserves in Lake County, Illinois are celebrating another bird-related milestone this year as our education red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) turns 30 years old.

Our education red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) turned 30 years old this year. Photo © Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.

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Bird-eat-bird world

Post by Jen Berlinghof

I remember the first time I saw it happen. It was a frigid Sunday in February, sixteen years ago. I had just started working for the Lake County Forest Preserves. The deep cold, the kind that temporarily freezes your eyelashes together every time you blink, kept potential hikers away from Ryerson Conservation Area that day. I ventured out only to fill the bird feeders, and the chickadees, juncos, cardinals, and woodpeckers quickly gathered around for a feast. I thought they would be my only visitors of the day. Then, a cacophony of bird wings ruptured the quiet. Bird visitors fled from the feeders in all directions. In a low hanging branch of a nearby oak, one bird remained: a Cooper’s hawk. It was devouring a mourning dove that had just been pecking around under the feeders only moments before.

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Hordes of hummingbirds

Post by Jen Berlinghof

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For me, most days on the job consist of time in my “office” outdoors—a woodland, prairie or wetland in the Lake County Forest Preserves—with my “clients”—students, teachers, and families interested in learning more about local nature. On those rare days spent plunking away at a computer indoors, the photo above is my view. Recently, this view is bustling with activity, as hordes of ruby-throated hummingbirds buzz around the feeders, bulking up for a long flight south.

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Bluebirds are back!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Last week while I was out checking our sap collection buckets at Ryerson Conservation Area, everything in the woods seemed a bleak brown and gray. It didn’t look much like spring was on our doorstep, but it sure sounded like it with the “plink plink” of sap dripping into aluminum buckets on the sugar maple trees and the slow “peep peep” of cold, little spring peeper frogs. Then, a male eastern bluebird landed on the branch above my head. He was a vivid blue exclamation point that seemed to shout, “Spring has arrived!”

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Nature at night

Post by Jen Berlinghof

This winter’s lack of snow has made enjoying the winter woods a little more difficult for me. So, when a scant few inches of snow fell last week I made my way to Old School Forest Preserve at dusk to explore one of the Lake County Forest Preserves solar-lit trails.

Inky black branches of old oaks played in contrast to the white-washed sky before the blush of an orange sherbet sunset took over. The woods were still and quiet as I searched for any signs of crepuscular creatures that capitalize on the twilight. Continue reading