About

Thank you for reading. This blog is an active effort to keep readers informed of current natural events and to offer helpful suggestions for exploring local nature niches in Lake County, Illinois. For many people, “Nature” starts with a capital “N.”

When asked to think of meaningful experiences in the outdoors, many minds automatically turn toward the grand vistas of huge National Parks or long road trips to faraway destinations. But what might be most beneficial for our health and environment is finding nature niches closer to home. Connect daily, not once a year. Explore the trails, and find your niche in the Lake County Forest Preserves.


About the author  Jen Berlinghof is a graduate of Loyola University and The National Outdoor Leadership School, as well as a Certified Interpretive Guide through The National Association of Interpretation. Her work as an outdoor guide and naturalist has taken her from the canyon lands of Utah to the shores of Lake Superior. Since 2003, she has been discovering nature near her hometown and working as an Environmental Educator for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois.

Jen birding yellowstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Behind the scenes  Assisting with editing and photography is Allison Frederick. She is Assistant Public Affairs Manager for the Lake County Forest Preserves. She is an active citizen scientist, surveying calling frogs and Odonate populations in Lake County, Illinois. Her background in Forestry and Natural Resources from Purdue University and passion for land stewardship is a great fit for the public relations team at a conservation agency. She believes that we can join forces to take major action against climate change and other environmental challenges. From restoration workdays in local preserves to exploring natural areas with her family, she works daily to inspire positive changes in the world around us.

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Behind the scenes  Brett Peto has served as Environmental Communications Specialist for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois since 2017. A graduate of Elmhurst College in 2015, Peto edits copy, selects and retouches photos, and ponders the Latin roots of species names in his spare time. Ever since his first science column in the college newspaper, Peto has found fun in the broad accessibility and deep understanding of complex subjects that effective science writing requires.

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Guest author Andrew Rutter joined the Natural Resources Department of the Lake County Forest Preserves as a Wildlife Biologist in 2016. But he was already a familiar face, as he had worked as a Southern Illinois University wildlife field technician in various forest preserves. Andrew has a Bachelor’s Degree from Emporia State University and recently received his Master’s Degree from SIU with the Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab studying river otter ecology.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Guest author Alyssa Firkus joined the Education Department of the Lake County Forest Preserves as an Education Manager in October 2018. Alyssa holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology from Humboldt State University and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Education from Western Washington University. Her work in environmental education has taken her around the world, from Australia to Alaska. She now enjoys going on local adventures with her family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Guest author Nan Buckardt, a long-time Lake County Forest Preserves employee, has seen many changes to the preserves during her career. As Director of Education, she puts her B.S. in Zoology and M.S. in Education to good use. The Education Department team helps tell Lake County’s natural and human history story. Nan spends much of her free time in nature with her family, especially enjoying birdwatching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Guest author Pati Vitt joined the Natural Resources Department of the Lake County Forest Preserves in late 2018. She holds a Ph.D. in Botany from the University of Connecticut, an M.S. in Botany & Plant Pathology from the University of Maine, and a B.A. from College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine. Having grown up botanically in Maine, she considers plants that are found in boreal forests as old friends, and is happy when she finds them and other new friends in Lake County. Prior to joining the Forest Preserves, Pati worked for nearly 20 years as a Conservation Scientist at the Chicago Botanic Garden.


Guest author Ken Klick has worked as a Restoration Ecologist at the Lake County Forest Preserves for 25 years. He finds joy and solace in looking at birds. His career has involved restoring and managing native plants and animals for more than 40 years.


Guest author Eileen Davis, Environmental Educator, has variously served the Lake County Forest Preserves as an intern, volunteer and staff member since 1997. She earned her B.S. in Zoology and Environmental Biology from Eastern Illinois University, and an M.S. in Environmental Education and Interpretation from University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point. Eileen teaches people of all ages about Lake County’s diverse ecosystems, and the plants and animals that call them home. In her free time, she enjoys tending her home garden and traveling in search of new nature adventures.


Guest author April Vaos has been an Environmental Educator with the Lake County Forest Preserves since 2004. She holds a degree in Environmental Studies from Gustavus Adolphus College and focuses on scout, school and boating programs. Since childhood, April has lived in many places—from the rural areas of Minnesota to the city—and loves finding nature all around her, from the prairies of Illinois to a patch of grass on the road.


You may contact us at jberlinghof@LCFPD.org, afrederick@LCFPD.org and bpeto@LCFPD.org.

Recent Posts

How animals survive the winter

Guest post by April Vaos

Living in Illinois, we’re lucky enough to enjoy a change of seasons. Though I often find it difficult to switch from the crunch of fall leaves to the crunch of snow, it can be a peaceful time to head outdoors. Recently, I went walking in Independence Grove in Libertyville, part of the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois. As I looked around in the quiet, contemplative landscape, I thought about the life that teemed all around me, and how it was now hidden from view or departed on a migration.

While leading winter walks, I’m often asked, “Where are all the animals?” It depends on the animal. Each employs different survival strategies that help it adapt and even thrive in winter. What, exactly, do animals do to make it through the challenges of cold temperatures and a lack of food? Well, I like to say they have MAD strategies: migrate, active and dormant.

When cool temperatures arrive in northern Illinois, so do dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis). Not only do they visit Illinois, they migrate into all of the lower 48 states to spend a milder winter than where they’re from: Canada. Stock photo.
When cool temperatures arrive in northern Illinois, so do dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis). Not only do they visit Illinois, they migrate into all of the lower 48 states to spend a milder winter than where they’re from: Canada. Stock photo.

Migrate: Many animals in Lake County migrate, or travel, from one place to another over short, medium or long distances to survive winter. It isn’t so much about the cold as the lack of food in winter. Food sources such as insects, plants and fish—which can’t be reached when waterbodies are frozen over—are largely unavailable.

Birds, butterflies and even bats are common migrators. Though we often think of animals migrating across hundreds or thousands of miles to different states or countries, they can also migrate short distances vertically. For example, some amphibians and insects burrow further down the soil horizon below the frost line to stay warm.

Lots of folks marvel over the long migration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), but hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) make extended flights, too. It’s believed that Illinois’ hoary bats migrate to southern California or Mexico for the winter, a 1,200-mile trip each way!

Hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) migrate to warm, southern locales for the winter. Photo © Merlin Tuttle.
Hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) migrate to warm, southern locales for the winter. Photo © Merlin Tuttle.

Active: Some animals remain active during winter. Doing so means they need to find food continuously to survive. To endure the weather, they may grow extra fur or build winter homes. Examples of animals that stay active include white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), coyotes (Canis latrans) and even channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

Northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) are both the Illinois state bird and a great example of an active winter animal. Cardinals are permanent residents, forgoing southward migration. Due to the cardinal’s varied diet of seeds, fruits and insects, they can find enough food in Lake County year-round. While often called warm-blooded, a better term is endothermic, meaning cardinals can produce their own body heat.

Northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) are red year-round. They get their color from carotenoid pigments in the seeds and fruits they eat. Stock photo.
Northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) are red year-round. They get their color from carotenoid pigments in the seeds and fruits they eat. Stock photo.
During winter, red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) practice a hunting technique called mousing. Fox ears are sensitive to the quiet sounds that prey animals make as they chew or move around beneath the snow. When a fox locks on to a vole or mouse, it pounces, punching through the snow headfirst, trying to snap up its prey. Stock photo.
During winter, red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) practice a hunting technique called mousing. Fox ears are sensitive to the quiet sounds that prey animals make as they chew food or move around beneath the snow. When a fox locks on to a vole or mouse, it pounces, punching through the snow headfirst, trying to snap up its prey. Stock photo.

Dormant: Dormancy describes a period when an animal’s metabolic activity is minimal and development is temporarily suspended to conserve energy. This allows species to prosper in environments where they might not otherwise be able to survive.

There are varying degrees of dormancy. Hibernation is full winter dormancy, which can last all season and includes decreased body temperature, heart rate and metabolic rate. Groundhogs (Marmota monax) and thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) are hibernators. On the other hand, torpor, a deeper sleep than normal—as seen in black-capped chickadees (Parus atricapillus) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)—may only last a few hours. These animals are active in warmer weather but may enter torpor daily or during bouts of extreme cold.

Groundhogs (Marmota monax) are skilled at surviving winter through hibernation—but contrary to popular culture, they don't have the ability to predict weather or the severity of the winter. Stock photo.
Groundhogs (Marmota monax) are skilled at surviving winter through hibernation—but contrary to popular culture, they don’t have the ability to predict the severity of the winter. Stock photo.

Wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) have an almost zombie-like adaptation. In fall, a wood frog finds a safe spot under a log or leaf litter. When the temperature in its home falls below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, the frog starts to freeze. This prompts its liver to convert glycerol into glucose, forming a sort of antifreeze. If you were to find a frozen wood frog, there’d be no heartbeat or breathing motion to tell you it was alive. But come spring, this hardy critter will thaw and hop away as if it never became a frog-sicle.

It’s interesting to note that most animals don’t have just one, but multiple strategies for outlasting winter. Blanding’s turtles (Emydoidea blandingii) are cold-blooded—or ectothermic—so they depend on the sun’s rays, plus air and water temperature, to keep their body temp ideal. For the winter, a Blanding’s turtle migrates down to the bottom of a wetland and buries itself in mud. Once safe and sound, it enters dormancy.

Looking for a way to not just survive but thrive this winter? Venture out for a hike with our Animals in Winter program on January 15, 2022, 1-4 pm. Or learn to decipher animal tracks by taking our Winter Tracking and Wildlife Observation Workshop program on January 29, 2022, 9:30 am-12 pm.

Whatever you choose, I hope you get outside this winter and enjoy the serenity of the season, knowing that many animals are hunkered down for the time being—just waiting for spring to return.

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