About

Thank you for reading. This blog is an active effort to keep readers informed of current natural events and to offer helpful suggestions for exploring local nature niches in Lake County, Illinois. For many people, “Nature” starts with a capital “N.”

When asked to think of meaningful experiences in the outdoors, many minds automatically turn toward the grand vistas of huge National Parks or long road-trips to far-away destinations. But what might be most beneficial for our health and environment is finding nature niches closer to home. Connect daily, not once a year. Explore the trails, and find your niche in the Lake County Forest Preserves.

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About the author  Jen Berlinghof is a graduate of Loyola University and The National Outdoor Leadership School, as well as a Certified Interpretive Guide through The National Association of Interpretation. Her work as an outdoor guide and naturalist has taken her from the canyon lands of Utah to the shores of Lake Superior. Since 2003, she has been discovering nature near her hometown and working as an Environmental Educator for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois.

Jen birding yellowstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Behind the scenes  Assisting with editing and photography is Allison Frederick. She is Assistant Public Affairs Manager for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois. Her background in Forestry and Natural Resources from Purdue University and wildlife monitoring experience is a great fit for the public relations team at a conservation agency. You may notice a shift to Allison’s “voice” from time to time when Jen is away exploring the aforementioned grand vistas.

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Behind the scenes  Brett Peto has served as Environmental Communications Specialist for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois since 2017. A graduate of Elmhurst College in 2015, Peto edits copy, selects and retouches photos, and ponders the Latin roots of species names in his spare time. Ever since his first science column in the college newspaper, Peto has found fun in the broad accessibility and deep understanding of complex subjects that effective science writing requires.

© Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Guest author Andrew Rutter joined the Natural Resources Department of the Lake County Forest Preserves as a Wildlife Biologist in 2016. But he was already a familiar face, as he had worked as a Southern Illinois University wildlife field technician in various forest preserves. Andrew has a Bachelor’s Degree from Emporia State University and recently received his Master’s Degree from SIU with the Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab studying river otter ecology.

 

 

 

 

 

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You may contact us at jberlinghof@LCFPD.org and afrederick@LCFPD.org.

Recent Posts

Leopards and tigers and bears!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Around the first frost is the best time for spotting bears in the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois…woolly bears, that is! These fuzzy caterpillars succumb to a late fall wanderlust and can often be found traversing trails and roads, as well as climbing vegetation and nibbling a last few bites before winter sets in. They belong to the subfamily Arctiinae, commonly known as tiger moths. Their scientific name stems from the ancient Greek word arktos (“bear”), for the appearance of their hairy larvae.

A woolly bear caterpillar (Pyrrharctia isabella) found along the Des Plaines River Trail. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

Any ten-year-old child can probably identify the most common woolly bear larva in the area, the isabella tiger moth (Pyrrharctia isabella). It boasts orange and black bristles in a banded pattern. That same child may also try to convince you this critter can predict the severity of the coming winter by looking at the length of the caterpillar’s bands of bristles. But just as groundhogs can’t truly predict the spring, moth larvae cannot predict the winter. After each molt, a stripe of the black setae (stiff hairs) is replaced by orange setae. This makes the orange band broadest in the last instar, or stage of larval development.

The author holds a giant leopard moth caterpillar (Hypercompe scribonia) in her hand. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

I found another type of woolly bear caterpillar on a recent hike at Ryerson Woods (Riverwoods) that might be less familiar to folks. The larva of the giant leopard moth (Hypercompe scribonia) sports shiny black bristles separated by red inter-segments. Like the isabella moth larva, this giant woolly bear lacks stinging spines and doesn’t bite. When alarmed, it curls up into a tight ball, displaying its setae like little swords that can irritate the skin and mucous membranes of potential predators. This defensive posture also makes its bright red inter-segments prominent, a literal “red flag” to warn predators they’re unpalatable.

In its defensive posture, a giant leopard moth caterpillar displays its stiff setae and red inter-segments. Photo © Donald W. Hall.

Once these woolly bears have gorged themselves on asters, milkweed, sunflowers, violets, and even dandelions—and almost finished growing as larvae—they ramble on to find a suitable spot under leaves or logs to wait out the winter. Unlike most moth larvae that spend our freezing months tucked inside a pupal “sleeping bag,” in general tiger moths overwinter as nearly full-grown caterpillars, pumping glycerol through their bodies to keep their cells from freezing solid. They then emerge in spring to munch a bit more before creating a cocoon and completing metamorphosis.

The familiar orange-and-black woolly bear caterpillar emerges in spring as an adult isabella tiger moth. Photo © Patrick Randall.

An adult giant leopard moth. Photo © Christopher J. Williams.

As the sun sets earlier in the final days of fall and winter approaches, take these last moments to try to find these fascinating larvae before they hide away and press pause on their development. Discover new trails with our Hike Lake County Challenge before it ends on November 30. Then, come spring, look for the adult moths when both larvae and people emerge to explore the new season.

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