Go take a hike

Post by Nan Buckardt

Everyone has one! At least, anyone who regularly hikes in the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois has one: a favorite trail. It might be the trail near your home or the one that reminds you of a secret only-I-know-about-this spot growing up. Maybe it holds a special memory. Whatever the reason, something about it always sparks joy in your heart.

I’ve been thinking about trails a lot this fall as I’ve hiked those selected for this year’s Hike Lake County (HLC) program. HLC has encouraged folks for 20-plus years to explore seven of 12 designated trails between mid-August and November 30. More than 200 miles of trails thread through dozens of preserves countywide, so the diversity of choices isn’t necessarily a big surprise, but it is a big benefit to residents and visitors.

What I appreciate most is that this extensive network gives me options when I’m planning a hike. How much time do I have? What’s the weather like? Do I want to visit a place I haven’t been recently? Where can I experience the best of the current season? Can I add a hike to an errand that can’t wait?

Every time, two major considerations are the trail condition and the season.

Since it’s fall, I’ve chosen trails in sunny areas that are just right to offset the cool autumn breezes. Also on the agenda are walks in woodland preserves where fallen leaves carpet the trail, creating nature’s artwork: unique mosaics of colors and patterns.

HLC offers two trails that show off very different fall palettes. Ryerson Woods in Riverwoods is stunning with the brilliant colors of the sugar maple woodland. Meanwhile, the Van Patten Woods trail in Wadsworth boasts oak crowns full of rich browns accented with subtle red overtones.

Thinking ahead a few months, I’d like to walk along the Des Plaines River and look for fragile pieces of ice resembling sparkly tutus or crystal teardrops clinging to tree trunks. These are sometimes called ice collars or ice skirts. I might also find tracks as animals leave clues to their daily routine in fresh-fallen snow.

Next spring, bouquets of flowers will appear on the woodland floor. But I choose trails where I can find migrating birds looking for a good place to nest or taking a break on their trip north. Warblers will flit about in flowering oaks searching for insects to eat. Shrub-loving birds, such as the brown thrasher (Toxostoma rufum), can be seen and heard in areas with a mix of grasses and low woody plants.

I already look forward to next summer when the trails will be full of green. Did you ever notice the huge variety in shades of green? People see more variation in it than any other color. Nature truly presents us with eye candy.

I have participated in each and every season of Hike Lake County. Many of those 20-plus years were with my family; now, as an empty nester, it’s only my husband and I out on the trails. We never know what we’ll discover when we hike but I can tell you we’re never disappointed.

You may already have a favorite trail, but there are always more to explore. I encourage you to look at a map, find a path you haven’t wandered yet, and experience it for yourself. Who knows…it might just become your new favorite!

If you’d like some good company on your hiking journey, try one of our Guided Hike Lake County programs on October 20, and November 3 and 10. These naturalist-guided walks feature a new trail each session. FREE. No registration required. All ages welcome. Out of respect for all participants, please leave pets at home. Service animals are permitted.

Leopards and tigers and bears!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Around the first frost is the best time for spotting bears in the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois…woolly bears, that is! These fuzzy caterpillars succumb to a late fall wanderlust and can often be found traversing trails and roads, as well as climbing vegetation and nibbling a last few bites before winter sets in. They belong to the subfamily Arctiinae, commonly known as tiger moths. Their scientific name stems from the ancient Greek word arktos (“bear”), for the appearance of their hairy larvae.

A woolly bear caterpillar (Pyrrharctia isabella) found along the Des Plaines River Trail. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

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Happy New Year!

Video

Happy Winter from the Lake County Forest Preserves!

Video by Brett Peto

Whether venturing outside for fresh air and exercise, or finding a gorgeous spot to sit quietly and reflect on the past year, we find great peace in the Lake County Forest Preserves.

Thank you all for following along on our adventures this year. We encourage you to find a quiet spot to just breathe—perhaps the still woodlands of Captain Daniel Wright Woods:

Cheers to a new winter and peaceful new year!

Snowflake anatomy

Post by Jen Berlinghof

My family and I spent the beginning of the new year in the Northwoods. We wanted quiet. We wanted nature. Most of all, we wanted snow. As we started out on a snowshoe trek to a nearby river, tiny snowflakes settled on my son’s navy blue parka. They seemed to freeze on contact for only a few seconds, forming miniature constellations, before melting into temporary teardrop stains. The filigree of each flake in those hushed, fleeting moments fascinated both of my boys.

snow-crystal1

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Nature at night

Post by Jen Berlinghof

This winter’s lack of snow has made enjoying the winter woods a little more difficult for me. So, when a scant few inches of snow fell last week I made my way to Old School Forest Preserve at dusk to explore one of the Lake County Forest Preserves solar-lit trails.

Inky black branches of old oaks played in contrast to the white-washed sky before the blush of an orange sherbet sunset took over. The woods were still and quiet as I searched for any signs of crepuscular creatures that capitalize on the twilight. Continue reading

Des Plaines River Trail—Route 22 to Lake-Cook Road

Post by Jen Berlinghof

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It was a new year and a new trail, as we completed the last leg of our Des Plaines River Trail journey to hike the entire length of Lake County, Illinois. We began this hike just south of Route 22, which led us south through the recently completed trail section and beyond to the southern border of the county. We left our tracks upon the trail, just as the animals do along this greenway. Along the way, we found fresh signs in the snow that mice, squirrels, small birds, raccoon, deer, fox and even some intrepid fat-tire cyclists had all traversed the trail before us, taking advantage of a balmy 40-degree day in January. Continue reading

Stories in the snow

Post by Jen Berlinghof

As the thermometer dipped to -8 degrees Fahrenheit this week, one thing was clear: the snow and cold are entrenched for a while longer. So are the stories of the animals, as told by the tracks etched in the frozen landscapes that sweep across the Lake County Forest Preserves. We may not see the animals themselves. However, each track, pile of scat, bit of hair clinging to a branch, hole in the snow and chewed acorn is an element of the tale from their winter excursions.

How do we decipher these stories? When trying to identify which animal made a particular track, it is important to look not only at the individual track but the overall pattern. Also, scan the surrounding habitat for clues.

Let’s see if you can figure out what happened in each of these nature vignettes:

mouse tracks

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