About lakecountynature

Jen Berlinghof is a graduate of Loyola University Chicago and The National Outdoor Leadership School, as well as a Certified Interpretive Guide through The National Association of Interpretation. Her work as an outdoor guide and naturalist has taken her from the canyonlands of Utah to the shores of Lake Superior. Since 2003, she has been rediscovering nature near her hometown and working as an Environmental Educator for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois.

Tick season has arrived.

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Spring seems to be a bit accelerated this year in the Lake County Forest Preserves. Trillium are already blooming at Ryerson Woods. Yesterday, I even saw a tiger swallowtail butterfly, wafting its way through the dappled light of the forest. Both of these species are typically associated with mid-May. With earlier than usual spring weather comes earlier than usual “tick season.” Like the trillium and swallowtail, ticks are a part of our natural areas.

By learning more about ticks, along with some mindful actions before you head outside, interactions with ticks can be minimized so our enjoyment of the outdoors can be maximized.

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Contrary to what many people think, ticks are not insects. They are arachnids. Like spiders, they have two body parts and eight legs. In addition, ticks have intricate mouthparts designed to bite and hang onto their host, which can be any warm-blooded animal in the area, including us. 

There are two species of ticks in Lake County, Illinois: deer tick (Ixodese scapularis) and wood tick (Dermacentor variabilis). Of these two species, only deer ticks can pass on Lyme disease. However, wood ticks, also referred to as American dog ticks, have the ability to pass on other bacterial infections such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia. Ticks need 80 percent humidity to survive. Therefore, they are often found in warm, moist areas.

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Wood ticks adults are twice as large as adult deer ticks. They can be easily identified by presence of white markings (near the head for females, covering the back for males) and are found most commonly in grassy areas.

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Deer ticks, also known as black-legged ticks, are much smaller in size, are darker in color than wood ticks, and can transmit Lyme disease. They are found more commonly in wooded areas, sandy areas, and leaf litter.

If you notice when outdoors with family or friends that some individuals seem to be “tick magnets,” while others come off the trail tick-free, you might be onto something. Studies have shown that ticks are attracted to individuals based on their unique chemical “footprint,” or combination of naturally occurring ammonia, carbon dioxide, fatty acids, as well as perfumes, lotions and soaps. Your age, sex, movement, temperature, and even the humidity in your exhaled breath can make you a more or less inviting host to a tick.

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While scientists haven’t pinpointed the exact combination of these factors that would evade ticks all together, there are still many things you can do to prevent tick interactions. You can start before you even go outdoors by choosing a “tick resistant” wardrobe. While it might not be the most fashionable, wearing light-colored, long sleeve clothing and tucking long pants into socks can help ticks from getting to your skin, and allows you to see the tiny ticks more easily. Both species of ticks are only about one-sixteenth of an inch in their nymph stage, which is what we typically see in the spring. In addition, applying insect repellent with DEET to your clothing (avoid your skin), provides another layer of defense. Products with permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing, and gear for extended protection.

When you come in from the outdoors, check your body, clothing, and pets thoroughly. Ticks simply crawling on you or your pet cannot transmit disease. If you find a tick embedded in your skin, quick removal is important. It typically takes 24 hours for an embedded tick to transmit disease. If a tick is overlooked and is found attached to the body later you should do the following to remove it:

  • Remove it immediately using small tweezers.
  • Grasp the mouth parts, as close to your skin as possible.
  • Pull it straight out slowly and avoid squeezing its body.
  • Wash the wound site and your hands thoroughly.
  • Visit a physician if unexplained rash or illness accompanied by fever develop.

With the warm weather, blooming wildflowers, and migrating birds, this early onset spring is a great time to get out and hit the Lake County Forest Preserve trails, or join us for our annual Native Plant Sale and Spring Bird Walks. Although you might encounter a tick this season, by following the recommendations above you will find that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” With some preventative measures it is easy to safely enjoy outdoor activities.

Skunk stories

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Just like fish stories, it seems everyone has a skunk story to tell. I have many, but my favorite one happened a few years ago in the spring, when I was getting ready to teach education programs at Greenbelt Forest Preserve. Before the students from a local school arrived, we were busy unloading supplies and setting them out around the preserve. When we returned to the van, we found a skunk sauntering right up the open lift-gate, looking curiously like he might climb in! We froze, chanting in a hushed tone to ourselves, “Please don’t go in there, please don’t go in there.” Either our chants worked, or he realized the preserved insects in the cases he was checking out were not a good meal. He casually wandered back to the brushy field and was long gone by the time the bus arrived.

 

Not surprisingly, the Latin name of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) means ” bad odor.” Until recently, members of this family, including 10 New World skunks and 2 Asian stink badgers, were included in the same mammal family as weasels. This group is now considered part of a separate family entirely, Mephitidae, which is characterized by black and white fur (warning coloration) and special glands that produce a foul musk.

Striped skunks are the only species of skunk in Illinois and are found commonly throughout Lake County, Illinois. They utilize a wide variety of habitats, always within reach of permanent water, from forest edges to grassy fields. Chiefly nocturnal, striped skunks locate mice, eggs, insects, and berries by their sense of smell and hearing, often digging and rooting around in soil for their favorite critters. While they are generally solitary animals, small groups have been known to den together in winter for warmth rather than companionship. While they do become dormant when temperatures dip below 15 degrees Fahrenheit, skunks are not hibernators, and are often active on warmer winter nights, becoming increasingly active during their breeding periods between February and March.

As breeding season begins, skunks emerge from dens, which are typically abandoned underground labyrinths from other animals such as woodchucks and fox. In a pinch, a skunk will dig its own very simple den. Regardless, skunks will almost always build a nest of leaves inside its burrow, in a very entertaining way, backing into the entrance hole with a giant mouthful of leaves as the caboose.

After mating, an adult female will continue to use dens, albeit different ones than in winter, to raise her 4-8 babies on her own, while the adult male returns to his solitary life. Young are typically born in May and will stay close to the mother, often following in a single file line, like fuzzy little ants marching, until late June or July.

Most skunk stories people tell me are different from mine, in that they almost always focus on what skunks are most known for: stinky spray. Skunks themselves are not foul-smelling animals, nor are their dens. The musk they create as a form of self-defense, is secreted by two internal glands at the base of the tail. Skunks have control over these scent glands and can form a stream or fine spray of the phosphorescent fluid that can glow at night and travel up to 20 feet. The scent glands contain only about 1/2 an ounce of the volatile, sulfuric fluid, which is used up in about 5 rounds of spraying. Since a skunk’s body can only produce about 1/2 an ounce of musk a week, it is truly a defense of last resort.

Skunks generally put up with a considerable amount of abuse before resorting to musking. When threatened, they will give several warning signs from stamping their front feet loudly, to clicking their teeth while hissing and growling. If that doesn’t do the trick, they have even been seen walking short distances on their front feet, their tails held high in the air, like some kind of a circus act. If all else fails, skunks will raise their tails, stand all their hair on end, twisting their bodies into a U-shape with both head and tail facing the threat, and let it fly. Sometimes, even after all of this, skunks can still fall victim to predators such as great horned owls and coyotes.

While it can be a positive and memorable experience to see skunks, from a distance, on a hike in our Lake Country Forest Preserves, sometimes they can be uninvited guests near our homes. By reducing elements, such as food, water, and shelter, that skunks require for survival, we can make areas around our homes less attractive real estate for wildlife. For more tips like this on living with wildlife, as well as a calendar of events that will get you out in the Lake County Forest Preserves this spring, visit us online and take a look at our newest edition of Horizons magazine.

Bird-eat-bird world

Post by Jen Berlinghof

I remember the first time I saw it happen. It was a frigid Sunday in February, sixteen years ago. I had just started working for the Lake County Forest Preserves. The deep cold, the kind that temporarily freezes your eyelashes together every time you blink, kept potential hikers away from Ryerson Conservation Area that day. I ventured out only to fill the bird feeders, and the chickadees, juncos, cardinals, and woodpeckers quickly gathered around for a feast. I thought they would be my only visitors of the day. Then, a cacophony of bird wings ruptured the quiet. Bird visitors fled from the feeders in all directions. In a low hanging branch of a nearby oak, one bird remained: a Cooper’s hawk. It was devouring a mourning dove that had just been pecking around under the feeders only moments before.

Cooper's hawk eating birdWhile perhaps shocking the first time you see it, Cooper’s hawks targeting bird feeders has become a more common occurrence over the years. These medium-sized hawks with long, striped tails, are forest dwellers that specialize in darting nimbly through the woods in pursuit of their favorite food—other birds. Rock doves and mourning doves are common prey, easy targets at bird feeders, which the hawk captures in its sharp talons and kills by squeezing.

According to data from Project FeederWatch, a citizen science survey of birds that visit feeders at backyards, there has been a significant increase of Cooper’s hawks visiting bird feeders over the past 25 years. There are a multitude of reasons behind this rise in visitation. Hawk populations in general have increased since the ban of DDT in the early 1970s, a pesticide that caused the thinning of egg shells in raptors and other birds.

Additionally, there has been a significant increase backyard bird feeding. Over 40 percent of American households report feeding backyard birds, which congregates a Cooper’s hawk’s favorite foods into one big buffet. Scientists have found that this growing food source may contribute to some hawks staying put during the winter in lieu of migrating each fall. Research thus far has not provided evidence that these newer winter residents have caused significant declines in songbird species at feeders.

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It’s fascinating to find the food chain in action in our local forest preserves and even our own backyards. While the winter bird feeder season is ending soon, we are on the precipice of spring when many other animals will rise from various forms of winter “sleep.” Others will migrate back from afar.fox

Each spring our interactions with wildlife tend to increase. The spring issue of our quarterly Horizons magazine, features an article on “Living with Wildlife.” The feature includes tips on how to best interact with animals that have found suitable habitat in your backyard or other urban areas. By remembering a few key factors about living alongside wildlife, we can avoid potential problems, and enjoy the excitement that these animals bring to our backyards and communities.

 

 

Snowflake anatomy

Post by Jen Berlinghof

My family and I spent the beginning of the new year in the Northwoods. We wanted quiet. We wanted nature. Most of all, we wanted snow. As we started out on a snowshoe trek to a nearby river, tiny snowflakes settled on my son’s navy blue parka. They seemed to freeze on contact for only a few seconds, forming miniature constellations, before melting into temporary teardrop stains. The filigree of each flake in those hushed, fleeting moments fascinated both of my boys.

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Halloween Hikes—30 years and counting…

Post by Jen “Blanding’s Turtle” Berlinghof

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This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Lake County Forest Preserves’ popular Halloween Hikes at Ryerson Conservation Area. This event is a witch’s potion of sorts: a dash of theater, a drop of night hike, a splash of environmental education, and a heap of old-fashioned family fun. Continue reading

Des Plaines River Trail Challenge

Post by Jen Berlinghof

The trail is complete! The final section of the Des Plaines River Trail and Greenway was completed in late 2015. This fulfills a vision 54 years in the making—an unbroken greenway along the Des Plaines River. The contiguous 31.4-mile trail spans the entire length of Lake County, Illinois. To celebrate this amazing gem, we at the Lake County Forest Preserves are challenging you to travel the entire length as part of our Des Plaines River Trail Challenge. Last year, Allison and I hiked the entire trail and chronicled it here on the blog. This month, we’re taking you on the water with us to highlight the lifeblood of this vision—the river itself.

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Hordes of hummingbirds

Post by Jen Berlinghof

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For me, most days on the job consist of time in my “office” outdoors—a woodland, prairie or wetland in the Lake County Forest Preserves—with my “clients”—students, teachers, and families interested in learning more about local nature. On those rare days spent plunking away at a computer indoors, the photo above is my view. Recently, this view is bustling with activity, as hordes of ruby-throated hummingbirds buzz around the feeders, bulking up for a long flight south.

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