About lakecountynature

Jen Berlinghof is a graduate of Loyola University Chicago and The National Outdoor Leadership School, as well as a Certified Interpretive Guide through The National Association of Interpretation. Her work as an outdoor guide and naturalist has taken her from the canyonlands of Utah to the shores of Lake Superior. Since 2003, she has been rediscovering nature near her hometown and working as an Environmental Educator for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois.

The din of the dog days

Post by Jen Berlinghof

The dog days of summer are a bounty for the senses. We see the lemon-yellow of whorled sunflower blooms, taste the ripe flavor of a homegrown tomato, smell the spicy sweetness of bee balm flowers, feel the heat of the day and the cool of the evening. Yet the most quintessential sensation of these end-of-summer days is hearing the overwhelming cacophony of cicada songs around the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois.

When we talk cicadas, the first questions that often come to mind concern periodical cicadas that emerge en masse every 17 years. This phenomenon is fascinating, but our last emergence of Magicicada occurred in 2007, so we will have to wait until 2024 to experience that spellbinding season again.

The cicadas we hear now, and indeed every summer, are considered annual cicadas. While their lifecycle actually lasts anywhere from two to five years, they’re not synchronized, so we end up hearing and seeing some each year.

Whether periodical or annual, all cicadas go through the same basic lifecycle. A female deposits rice-shaped eggs into grooves on small branches. She makes these grooves with her sharp ovipositor, a sword-like organ that extends from her abdomen for this purpose. Later, teeny cicada nymphs hatch out, then plummet to the ground and burrow in the soil in search of a root to feed on. They start with grass roots, and as they grow and molt, the nymphs eventually work their way up to a host tree root where they’ll sip away at sap for years.

When it’s time to emerge, cicada nymphs claw out of the dirt and head for higher ground to complete one final molt: shedding their exoskeltons. The exoskeletons, or what my kids always called “cicada coats,” remain on tree trunks and tall grasses long after the cicadas’ wings have inflated and they’ve flown away to complete their courtship and mating rituals.

The most obvious of those rituals is the mating songs of the male cicadas. These “true bugs” sing with their tymbal, an organ with a series of ribs that buckle when the cicada flexes its muscle. Like a bendy straw being pushed together and pulled apart, each snap of a rib collectively creates the loud, buzzing song.

And loud it is, sometimes reaching up to 100 decibels, the same intensity as a motorcycle rumbling past on a warm summer night. It may seem strange—and deafening—that a cicada sports exposed eardrums on its abdomen right next to the tymbal. But nature has figured out a workaround; just as male cicadas start to sing, a small muscle folds the eardrum shut.

You might have noticed the cicada chorus isn’t monotonous. It includes a variety of buzzing, clicking, and grinding noises. There are actually more than 190 species and subspecies of annual cicadas throughout North America. In Lake County, we commonly hear three species. The dog-day cicada (Neotibicen canicularis) sounds like a buzzsaw and tends to sing during the heat of the day. The scissor-grinder cicada (Neotibicen pruinosus) sings its grinding song from late morning until dusk. And Linne’s cicada (Neotibicen linnei) sounds like a whirring rattle all day long.

For better or worse, our eardrums don’t fold shut when cicada songs really get going. It’s worth keeping in mind, though, that what may seem like racket to us is sweet music to female cicadas’ ears. Enjoy the crescendo of the chorus in these dog days of summer.

The wonder of wood ducks

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Spring is the starting block for wildlife in the race to find suitable mates and nesting sites. With the increased flurry in wildlife activity, staff at the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois also get an increased flurry of phone calls with questions from the public. One recent call came from a gentleman in disbelief upon seeing ducks perched in his trees. He was utterly transfixed by the phenomenon. The call brought back a flash of memory for me of the first time I saw a wood duck (Aix sponsa) as a child, on my maternal grandfather’s property in northern Illinois. Grandpa “Duck,” as we affectionately called him, was an avid outdoorsman. He spent a few moments that spring day pointing out the distinct, vibrantly hued male and the more muted female near a nest hole in an old maple tree. The pair then took off into the woods to the soundtrack of their high-pitched whistling calls.

Male wood ducks are easily identifiable by their glossy green head, chestnut breast, and other vibrant colors. Stock photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

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Leopards and tigers and bears!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Around the first frost is the best time for spotting bears in the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois…woolly bears, that is! These fuzzy caterpillars succumb to a late fall wanderlust and can often be found traversing trails and roads, as well as climbing vegetation and nibbling a last few bites before winter sets in. They belong to the subfamily Arctiinae, commonly known as tiger moths. Their scientific name stems from the ancient Greek word arktos (“bear”), for the appearance of their hairy larvae.

A woolly bear caterpillar (Pyrrharctia isabella) found along the Des Plaines River Trail. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

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Happy birthday to our hawk

Post by Jen Berlinghof

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a landmark law that protects bird species worldwide. To honor and celebrate this milestone, organizations and citizens have teamed up to designate 2018 the “Year of the Bird.” We at the Lake County Forest Preserves in Lake County, Illinois are celebrating another bird-related milestone this year as our education red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) turns 30 years old.

Our education red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) turned 30 years old this year. Photo © Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.

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Summer “buzz kill”

Post by Jen Berlinghof

The sun had set, the campfire was doused, and the food was stashed away for the night as my sons and I tucked ourselves into our sleeping bag cocoons, thoroughly exhausted in a way one can only be from a day spent entirely outdoors. Still, sleep would not come easily. The whirling drone of thousands of annual cicadas buzzed through the nylon walls of our tent loud enough to overpower our fatigue. I lay awake, thinking it odd the cicadas would be calling after dark, when I caught a hint of the rising full moon through the ceiling screen and realized they were staying up late to party with the extra light. One of my boys groaned, “Isn’t there anything that can stop these CICADAS?” As a matter of fact, the next day we found just the thing: a cicada killer wasp (Sphecius speciosus).

The author holds a dead cicada killer wasp in her palm. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

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“Toadally” awesome!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Last week, our Wetland Explorers summer nature campers went wild…in a good way! We were hiking along the Des Plaines River Trail when we came upon a major toad hatch-out. Hundreds of dime-sized toadlets took over the trail, prompting shrieks of excitement from the campers. The kids scurried around, scooping up handfuls of toads, trying to save all the hopping and popping amphibians from potentially hazardous bike tires and hiking boots along the trail.

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A tale of two squirrels

Post by Jen Berlinghof and Allison Frederick

Everywhere you look this time of year, animals are tending to nests during spring’s baby season. Squirrels are very active at this time with the bounties of spring. Food reserves from winter are low, and energy demands are high with young in the drey (their leafy, treetop summer homes) demanding to be fed. So, squirrels turn from their habits of digging for winter caches and begin eating buds, flowers, fungi and lichens. They will take advantage of almost ANY food source at this time of year!

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