About lakecountynature

Jen Berlinghof is a graduate of Loyola University Chicago and The National Outdoor Leadership School, as well as a Certified Interpretive Guide through The National Association of Interpretation. Her work as an outdoor guide and naturalist has taken her from the canyonlands of Utah to the shores of Lake Superior. Since 2003, she has been rediscovering nature near her hometown and working as an Environmental Educator for the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois.

Leopards and tigers and bears!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Around the first frost is the best time for spotting bears in the Lake County Forest Preserves in northern Illinois…woolly bears, that is! These fuzzy caterpillars succumb to a late fall wanderlust and can often be found traversing trails and roads, as well as climbing vegetation and nibbling a last few bites before winter sets in. They belong to the subfamily Arctiinae, commonly known as tiger moths. Their scientific name stems from the ancient Greek word arktos (“bear”), for the appearance of their hairy larvae.

A woolly bear caterpillar (Pyrrharctia isabella) found along the Des Plaines River Trail. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

Any ten-year-old child can probably identify the most common woolly bear larva in the area, the isabella tiger moth (Pyrrharctia isabella). It boasts orange and black bristles in a banded pattern. That same child may also try to convince you this critter can predict the severity of the coming winter by looking at the length of the caterpillar’s bands of bristles. But just as groundhogs can’t truly predict the spring, moth larvae cannot predict the winter. After each molt, a stripe of the black setae (stiff hairs) is replaced by orange setae. This makes the orange band broadest in the last instar, or stage of larval development.

The author holds a giant leopard moth caterpillar (Hypercompe scribonia) in her hand. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

I found another type of woolly bear caterpillar on a recent hike at Ryerson Woods (Riverwoods) that might be less familiar to folks. The larva of the giant leopard moth (Hypercompe scribonia) sports shiny black bristles separated by red inter-segments. Like the isabella moth larva, this giant woolly bear lacks stinging spines and doesn’t bite. When alarmed, it curls up into a tight ball, displaying its setae like little swords that can irritate the skin and mucous membranes of potential predators. This defensive posture also makes its bright red inter-segments prominent, a literal “red flag” to warn predators they’re unpalatable.

In its defensive posture, a giant leopard moth caterpillar displays its stiff setae and red inter-segments. Photo © Donald W. Hall.

Once these woolly bears have gorged themselves on asters, milkweed, sunflowers, violets, and even dandelions—and almost finished growing as larvae—they ramble on to find a suitable spot under leaves or logs to wait out the winter. Unlike most moth larvae that spend our freezing months tucked inside a pupal “sleeping bag,” in general tiger moths overwinter as nearly full-grown caterpillars, pumping glycerol through their bodies to keep their cells from freezing solid. They then emerge in spring to munch a bit more before creating a cocoon and completing metamorphosis.

The familiar orange-and-black woolly bear caterpillar emerges in spring as an adult isabella tiger moth. Photo © Patrick Randall.

An adult giant leopard moth. Photo © Christopher J. Williams.

As the sun sets earlier in the final days of fall and winter approaches, take these last moments to try to find these fascinating larvae before they hide away and press pause on their development. Discover new trails with our Hike Lake County Challenge before it ends on November 30. Then, come spring, look for the adult moths when both larvae and people emerge to explore the new season.

Happy birthday to our hawk

Post by Jen Berlinghof

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a landmark law that protects bird species worldwide. To honor and celebrate this milestone, organizations and citizens have teamed up to designate 2018 the “Year of the Bird.” We at the Lake County Forest Preserves in Lake County, Illinois are celebrating another bird-related milestone this year as our education red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) turns 30 years old.

Our education red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) turned 30 years old this year. Photo © Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.

Continue reading

Summer “buzz kill”

Post by Jen Berlinghof

The sun had set, the campfire was doused, and the food was stashed away for the night as my sons and I tucked ourselves into our sleeping bag cocoons, thoroughly exhausted in a way one can only be from a day spent entirely outdoors. Still, sleep would not come easily. The whirling drone of thousands of annual cicadas buzzed through the nylon walls of our tent loud enough to overpower our fatigue. I lay awake, thinking it odd the cicadas would be calling after dark, when I caught a hint of the rising full moon through the ceiling screen and realized they were staying up late to party with the extra light. One of my boys groaned, “Isn’t there anything that can stop these CICADAS?” As a matter of fact, the next day we found just the thing: a cicada killer wasp (Sphecius speciosus).

The author holds a dead cicada killer wasp in her palm. Photo © Lake County Forest Preserves.

Continue reading

“Toadally” awesome!

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Last week, our Wetland Explorers summer nature campers went wild…in a good way! We were hiking along the Des Plaines River Trail when we came upon a major toad hatch-out. Hundreds of dime-sized toadlets took over the trail, prompting shrieks of excitement from the campers. The kids scurried around, scooping up handfuls of toads, trying to save all the hopping and popping amphibians from potentially hazardous bike tires and hiking boots along the trail.

Continue reading

A tale of two squirrels

Post by Jen Berlinghof and Allison Frederick

Everywhere you look this time of year, animals are tending to nests during spring’s baby season. Squirrels are very active at this time with the bounties of spring. Food reserves from winter are low, and energy demands are high with young in the drey (their leafy, treetop summer homes) demanding to be fed. So, squirrels turn from their habits of digging for winter caches and begin eating buds, flowers, fungi and lichens. They will take advantage of almost ANY food source at this time of year!

Continue reading

“Submarine cottages”

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Late spring and early summer are busy seasons for children visiting the Lake County Forest Preserves for pond study programs. The shorelines of ponds pulse with the excitement of students, nets in hand, ready to discover the macroinvertebrates teeming under the water’s surface. The most delightful find this season by students has to be what Henry David Thoreau once called the “submarine cottages” of caddisfly larvae.

Continue reading

Tick season has arrived.

Post by Jen Berlinghof

Spring seems to be a bit accelerated this year in the Lake County Forest Preserves. Trillium are already blooming at Ryerson Woods. Yesterday, I even saw a tiger swallowtail butterfly, wafting its way through the dappled light of the forest. Both of these species are typically associated with mid-May. With earlier than usual spring weather comes earlier than usual “tick season.” Like the trillium and swallowtail, ticks are a part of our natural areas.

By learning more about ticks, along with some mindful actions before you head outside, interactions with ticks can be minimized so our enjoyment of the outdoors can be maximized.

9

Contrary to what many people think, ticks are not insects. They are arachnids. Like spiders, they have two body parts and eight legs. In addition, ticks have intricate mouthparts designed to bite and hang onto their host, which can be any warm-blooded animal in the area, including us.  Continue reading